Marco Battaglini

These paintings by Marco Battaglini are perhaps the best example of classical meeting modern that I know of:
MARCO BATTAGLINI

Battaglini invites us to think that in today’s global village, with the ‘democratization’ of culture, the evolution of knowledge, information immediacy, immersed in the heterogeneity, the Patchwork Culture forces us to confront with a need understanding beyond our geographical boundaries of time. Probably the uniqueness of the Italian artist Marco Battaglini is to conceptualize the possible coexistence of the ideals of classical beauty with the anti-aesthetic, the combination of the divine and refined with the vulgar, through a composition that can complement different realities in an eternal instant. His research of multidimensionality leads him to overlap different temporal, spatial and cultural realities, where everything seems to make sense… This is ultimately the Battaglini’s purpose: remove barriers that distort the perception of reality.
You can see more of the experly painted works below:
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Pictures via Saatchiart.com

 

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This Is Not Clothing Collection III

Museums are actually one of my most favorite places. It’s super quiet and relaxed and you get inspired by all the art around you. And sometimes I just like to sit there and watch people. I know I am so weird. However taking that museum aspect and transforming it into a whole collection is basically (actually this is just a super simple way to explain it) what This Is Not Clothing did for Collection III

This Is Not Clothing is a luxury brand and consumerist art movement. Artist Jam Sutton celebrates and reinvents masterful artworks, juxtaposing contemporary culture and fine art.  The clothing is considered a wearable canvas, featuring original bespoke artwork prints onto ethical fair trade cotton.

Collection III takes inspiration from classical sculpture and modern protest. The collection features a series of digital sculptures created by Jam Sutton using 3d scanning techniques of real-life models. (Digital sculpture models: Jack Beran, Emelie Stenman & Joel Hicks. 3D scanning technology provided by Ten24. 3D data refinement by Ten24, additional modelling by Ben Douglas.) “It’s a way for me to exhibit my artwork in a way that’s different to a gallery or museum setting“, says Jam Sutton.
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Pictures via This Is Not Clothing
Lookbook styling by Andrew Davis. Styling assistant Sam Carder. Lookbook models: Tommy Lee @ Models 1 – George Mowlan @ Models 1 | Grooming: Emilie Yong

FKA Twigs

And there she was dressed in all black everything, with this superstar aura and this clear angle-like voice: FKA twigs!
hhThe whole show was on point: her singing, her dancing, her talking… And I don’t know if you know that but streets are talking that she became known as twigs for the way her joints crack during warming up for dance classes. She added the initialism FKA (Formerly Known As) to her name when another artist called twigs complained about her use of the name. So where is the other artist now? Just asking…
However I was really impressed by the show. It was so different from everybody elses and I could swear it’s not only because the music is on a whole nother level of creativity. And I am  sorry for the German crowd being stiff as usual. It is such a difference if you got to a concert in the USA and Germany. Like huge difference!
1901905_717074935049384_6125151052380449291_n Processed with VSCOcam with p5 presetShe is a walking piece of art. And I can’t wait for more to come!

Aiko Tezuka

Back at home, I thought it was time to do some gallery hopping. And the reason why I visited Mikko Sato Gallery is because of artist Aiko Tezuka, who’s work is often composed of fabrics that she either finds or designs, and involves both making and destroying as she and her helpers unpick portions of the fabric revealing the warp and the weft of the original looming process.

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Aiko Tezuka came to Europe from her native Japan in 2010, first to London and then to Berlin, on a Künstlerhaus Bethanien Residency. She now lives and works in a flat in the fashionable Neukölln area in southeast Berlin.

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“Over the years I have become increasingly fixated on fabrics, especially those preceding the 17th century and the ancient eras. When visiting fabric museums, I often wonder how the early textile artists made such exquisite pieces without electricity. It is apparently now impossible to remake 8th century Japanese fabrics, even if we were to use the latest technology, because the techniques have since been lost.  I am interested in loosening up these invisible narratives to unravel forgotten histories or discover new plotlines. Pervading my creative processes are techniques and rules that I have developed over time: untying and unwinding fabric, revealing its structure, juxtaposing time and place, to name but a few. I do not cut or paste, or add or subtract matter. By unravelling and recomposing the structures and stories hidden within the material, I try to capture overflowing time and the continuous process of metamorphosis.” Foto 2

“I endeavor to weave the fabric of our time into my fabric with both a sense of timelessness and temporariness. Therefore, though it may seem transient and ephemeral, I hope the presence of my piece to be felt far beyond our time.” Foto 3 Foto 4 Foto 5

And she deserves so much more than just a few pieces being showed in this small gallery. Like this shit is for museums. One day when I have mucho dinero one of her art pieces will be hanging on my walls. I swear.

Jeff Koons: A Retrospective

My NY trip is coming to and end. And I made it a tradition to visit the Whitney Museum on my last day. Like that’s what I have been doing the last two times. This time no difference.  So I had the pleasure to see some of Jeff Koons, an American artist who is known for reproductions of banal objects. Critics are sharply divided in their views of Koons artistry, because some of them see his work as pioneering and of major art-historical importance. and others dismiss his work as simple kitsch. I find it to be the shit.
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Jeff Koons is widely regarded as one of the most important, influential, popular, and controversial artists of the postwar era. Throughout his career, he has pioneered new approaches to the readymade, tested the boundaries between advanced art and mass culture, challenged the limits of industrial fabrication, and transformed the relationship of artists to the cult of celebrity and the global market. Yet despite these achievements, Koons has never been the subject of a retrospective surveying the full scope of his career. Comprising almost 150 objects dating from 1978 to the present, this exhibition will be the most comprehensive ever devoted to the artist’s groundbreaking oeuvre. By reconstituting all of his most iconic works and significant series in a chronological narrative, the retrospective will allow visitors to understand Koons’s remarkably diverse output as a multifaceted whole.

His art might be super sexual for other, but for me it was regular shit. Like I wasn’t even offended while others were kinda looking like they were shocked (in the Made in Heave section). And every art period from Easyfun, to Popeye to Gazing Ball was just awesome.
So check out a different kind of view on art (and I love this exhibition for just letting people take pictures):Foto 1hh (1) hh (2) hh (3) hh (4) hh (5) hh

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