Marco Battaglini

These paintings by Marco Battaglini are perhaps the best example of classical meeting modern that I know of:
MARCO BATTAGLINI

Battaglini invites us to think that in today’s global village, with the ‘democratization’ of culture, the evolution of knowledge, information immediacy, immersed in the heterogeneity, the Patchwork Culture forces us to confront with a need understanding beyond our geographical boundaries of time. Probably the uniqueness of the Italian artist Marco Battaglini is to conceptualize the possible coexistence of the ideals of classical beauty with the anti-aesthetic, the combination of the divine and refined with the vulgar, through a composition that can complement different realities in an eternal instant. His research of multidimensionality leads him to overlap different temporal, spatial and cultural realities, where everything seems to make sense… This is ultimately the Battaglini’s purpose: remove barriers that distort the perception of reality.
You can see more of the experly painted works below:
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Pictures via Saatchiart.com

 

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Aiko Tezuka

Back at home, I thought it was time to do some gallery hopping. And the reason why I visited Mikko Sato Gallery is because of artist Aiko Tezuka, who’s work is often composed of fabrics that she either finds or designs, and involves both making and destroying as she and her helpers unpick portions of the fabric revealing the warp and the weft of the original looming process.

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Aiko Tezuka came to Europe from her native Japan in 2010, first to London and then to Berlin, on a Künstlerhaus Bethanien Residency. She now lives and works in a flat in the fashionable Neukölln area in southeast Berlin.

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“Over the years I have become increasingly fixated on fabrics, especially those preceding the 17th century and the ancient eras. When visiting fabric museums, I often wonder how the early textile artists made such exquisite pieces without electricity. It is apparently now impossible to remake 8th century Japanese fabrics, even if we were to use the latest technology, because the techniques have since been lost.  I am interested in loosening up these invisible narratives to unravel forgotten histories or discover new plotlines. Pervading my creative processes are techniques and rules that I have developed over time: untying and unwinding fabric, revealing its structure, juxtaposing time and place, to name but a few. I do not cut or paste, or add or subtract matter. By unravelling and recomposing the structures and stories hidden within the material, I try to capture overflowing time and the continuous process of metamorphosis.” Foto 2

“I endeavor to weave the fabric of our time into my fabric with both a sense of timelessness and temporariness. Therefore, though it may seem transient and ephemeral, I hope the presence of my piece to be felt far beyond our time.” Foto 3 Foto 4 Foto 5

And she deserves so much more than just a few pieces being showed in this small gallery. Like this shit is for museums. One day when I have mucho dinero one of her art pieces will be hanging on my walls. I swear.

Van Gogh and Vermeer

And then you have all that Van Gogh and Vermeer all over the fashion pieces. And heaven just came to earth.

Eric Franzel, the designer of Franzel Amsterdam dropped his SS15 collection during Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Amsterdam a couple of days ago. And this collection is so Ghetto-Chanel (in case you don’t know that’s my new term to describe a unique combination of street couture and haute fashion) and that’s what Franzel Amsterdam is representing: a clean mix between menswear and sportswear with a touch of street. It’s fashion for a man who takes life head on and is not afraid to fall and pick him self up in the process.

And beyond the fashion aspect this collection is representing myself so hardcore. Because…like…not only do I wish people in my hood would walk around like this. Like I don’t even know how to explain it. And you know what’s funny?! The streets in my hood are named after famous painters like Kandinsky or Edvard Munch and probably 90% of the people here can’t associate any painting to the name. Like basically that art and street aspect is what is catching me, if that makes any sense. However…this Franzel Amsterdam fashion is just so smart.

And I think I am just going to go to Amsterdam during next Fashion Week. For real, for real, for real. So count me in, Eric!
Franzel Amsterdam Franzel-Amsterdam_ss15_fy4 Franzel-Amsterdam_ss15_fy5 Franzel-Amsterdam_ss15_fy6 Franzel-Amsterdam_ss15_fy7 Franzel-Amsterdam_ss15_fy3Pictures via Fucking Young

Daily Dose Of Art

And here comes my daily dose of art.
I remember that after all the shopping and sightseeing that was done in Milan I need a little bit of education. And it was nowhere else but on the Duomo di Milano (Milan cathedral) where I saw this huge billboard of Gustav Klimt’s painting saying that there is an exhibition  called Klimt – Alle Origini di un Mito ( The origins of a legend) at the Palazzo Reale Milano, which is actually next to the Duomo.  This was the moment where I ran down the stairs of the Duomo, which was kind of claustrophobic and I had a couple of small panic attacks, but I survived.

However, I payed my ticket, got in to exhibition and was surrounded with Klimt’s best known masterpieces from Adam and Eve (1917) to Judith II (1909) and The Sunflower (1907). Just a side note: Gustav Klimt is an Austrian symbolist painter, who’s primary subject was the female body and his pictures all seem kind of erotic.
And you should know me by know and this should not surprise you: I tried to take pictures. I just wish these pictures would show how the paintings really look like, because the quality is shit and it looks brutally beautiful when you stand in front of them. But hey I tried and this is just a sneak peak, you really have to go and see the exhibition :

10384145_812932185384830_6749690826594412725_n Foto 1 Foto 2 Foto 3 Foto 4 Foto 5

The Artist

I noticed every time I really like a topic I decided to write about, the blog post always ends up being shitty. And when I just write shit it just seems to be become a good blog post. Like wt actual f is wrong with me? So I want to apologize in advance, because I feel like this one not going to be the best post ever. But it is one I really like to talk about.

The artist Christopher Mudgetand his work. Seeing his black and white paintings made me think: Is that Picasso? No, seriously, is this Picasso? Like this is so Picasso without being Picasso. I was confused for a couple of seconds until I realized that Christopher pays homage with putting his own artsy handwriting into strictly black and white paintings.
Mr. Mudgget explains his work:  “Constraining my work to monochromatic renderings allows me to portray my subjects with a universality that transcends the limits, as it were, of both color and shape. Not allowing color to determine form, nor form to define essence, I bring an existentialist quality to my work that many artists only achieve through abstraction.”

And he continues:
“I play with my subjects, but respect their humanity. Perfection is an abstraction; imperfect existence is an art. I bend, but do not distort, I bruise, but do not break. Through careful choice of subject, color and technique, I am able to paint an exciting and insightful portrait of universal humanity that is race-less but not faceless.”

I am super bad at describing art, but I know what I like and I like these paintings. So good work, Mr. Mudgett!

MUDGETT_Boy-bear_400 Mudgett_Churchgoers_2012_400 MUDGETT_THEBOXER_2013WEB_400 MUDGETT_MUSICIAN2_2012WEB_o_400Pictures via Christopher Mudgget

Andy Dixon

It’s finally Friday and call me nuts, but not going to uni for a couple of days is cool, but then again I get bored way too easily.  Wait…did I just say I miss uni? I know I am going to regret this sentence on Monday. But I need at least some kind of food for my brain and thank God I have this blog. So I figured I am going to stimulate my lobus occipitalis with some art. So I came across following createur de peinture:

Currently working out of Vancouver, Canada, Andy Dixon‘s work contrasts refined subject matter with a coarse application of his materials. Although his subjects are often romantic, Dixon’s approach and use of colour remove their idealism, accenting an alternative beauty found within the imperfection and humanity of both the subject and the artist simultaneously.Evoking an era of modernist painting, Andy Dixon’s work is both expressive and contemporary in form and aesthetic.

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Pictures via AndyDixon.net